Aggressive Mechanical, Inc

How Air Pollutants Travel Into Your Home

02 Nov
How Air Pollutants Travel Into Your Home

You would think that as airtight as homes are these days, air pollutants couldn’t find their way inside your home. But that’s not the case — they do get in, where they join a number of other air pollutants that are generated inside your home, and that are compromising your indoor air quality.

Fortunately there are ways to control these pesky invaders. Here’s how they get inside and how to keep them out.

Dust

Dust is generally the no. 1 air pollutant in most homes. It’s hard to eliminate completely, but you can control it by regularly air sealing your home with caulk and weatherstripping. Also, remove your shoes before entering your home. Vacuum regularly with a HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter and dust with microfiber cloths.

Pet Dander

Dander is composed of flaky skin from your pets (humans shed it too!). Many people are allergic to it. Wash pets once a week. Brush them outdoors frequently. You can also use a vacuum hose or special pet vacuum if your pet will tolerate it.

Pollen

Pollen wafts into the home when the windows or doors are open, or else travels inside on clothing and pets. Change clothing on entering the home, or brush it off. Sequester blooming indoor plants in one room until they stop giving off pollen.

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

VOCs are given off as gases from chemicals in dry cleaning solvent, pressed wood products, textiles and many household products. Keep chemicals capped and stored away from the living space. Air out dry cleaning and pressed wood products before bringing it indoors.

Mold

Mold occurs when damp conditions prevail. Fix leaks in plumbing and the ceiling or roof. Avoid taking long showers, and clean any appearance of mold, mildew or fungus with a solution of vinegar and water. Install exhaust ventilation in the bathroom and over the kitchen range to eliminate excess moisture in these areas. Installing ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) lights in your HVAC system can also help.

We’ve got other tips for controlling indoor air pollutants. Contact Aggressive Mechanical Contractors. We’ve served Monmouth County since 1948.

Our goal is to help educate our customers in Monmouth County, New Jersey and surrounding areas about energy and home comfort issues (specific to HVAC systems). 

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